TOD Literature

Brownfield Resources
Here you’ll find three resources on brownfields from the Northeast-Midwest Institute: on key issues and opportunities for communities, on enhancing brownfields projects’ bottom line, and strategies for encouraging clean-up and redevelopment.

Getting to Smart Growth II: 100 More Policies for Implementation
This manual for Smart Growth implementation offers 10 policy recommendations for each of 10 Smart Growth goals. To achieve one of those goals, the guidebook suggests a number of strategies, from car shares to bike programs.

Growing Cooler: The Evidence on Urban Development and Climate Change
This report makes the case that reducing vehicle miles traveled is an important component of GHG reduction. The high level of energy use attributed to the growth in VMT alone makes transit-oriented development policies increasingly important parts of an overall solution.

Land Development at Selected Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Stations
This report continues upon an earlier study of land development impacts around stations on New Jersey’s Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Line in Hoboken, Jersey City, Bayonne, Weehawken, and Union City.

Planning for Transit-Friendly Land Use: A Handbook for New Jersey Communities
This handbook is designed to assist planning officials, planning and zoning boards, technical staff and the general community in creating an environment around a transit stop that is a safe, clean, vibrant and active place.

“Progress and Future”: Second Transit Village Symposium. Summary Proceedings
On June 6, 2006, leaders from the public sector, private industry and non-governmental organizations gathered in New Brunswick to take stock of New Jersey’s support of the Transit Village Initiative, which facilitates targeted development and redevelopment near transit stations.

The Returning City: Historic Preservation and Transit in the Age of Civic Renewal
Using detailed case studies from around the country, The Returning City demonstrates how transit and historic preservation act in complementary ways to invigorate urban and suburban neighborhoods.

What About Our Schools?
This study examines the rate of school children generated by transit-oriented development, addressing—and dispelling—one of the most common public misperceptions hindering TOD proposals.

Visualizing Density
Through text and color photographs, the authors demonstrate the tenets of good density, highlighting locations where density has developed organically or been handled well. They demonstrate how the visual impact of density is not always what it seems.

Getting to Work: Reconnecting Jobs with Transit
New Jersey Future released Getting to Work, a report documenting the commuting habits of New Jersey residents and demonstrating the important connection between the state’s pattern of employment locations and its transportation challenges.

Design Charettes for Sustainable Communities
In this book, the author argues that the charrette format is essential to creating sustainable communities in the face of divergent problems, outlining practical techniques for orchestrating productive design charrettes.

Growing Cooler: The Evidence on Urban Development and Climate Change
This report makes the case that reducing vehicle miles traveled is an important component of GHG reduction. The high level of energy use attributed to the growth in VMT alone makes transit-oriented development policies increasingly important parts of an overall solution.

Moving Cooler: An Analysis of Transportation Strategies for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions
According to this report, energy-efficient vehicles and cleaner fuels alone will not solve the nation’s problem of excess greenhouse gas emissions; the U.S. must also adopt policies that encourage compact development, reduce driving and expand mass transit use.

Post Carbon Cities: Planning for Energy and Climate Uncertainty
Post Carbon Cities provides a sobering view of the realities faced by local governments with decreasing energy supplies and climate change, a tool for local decision makers who want their municipalities to remain economically and environmentally viable during this uncertain period.

Brownfield Resources
Here you’ll find three resources on brownfields from the Northeast-Midwest Institute: on key issues and opportunities for communities, on enhancing brownfields projects’ bottom line, and strategies for encouraging clean-up and redevelopment.

Paved Over: Surface Parking Lots or Opportunities for Tax-Generating, Sustainable Development
This study of the Chicago region examines the potential development benefits of more intensive use of surface parking near transit, comparing current costs of surface parking lots near rail stations with the potential benefits if they were developed instead into TOD.

Briefing Report Number 3: Case Studies for Transit-Oriented Development
Case Studies for Transit-Oriented Development offers a useful summary of some of the wide variety of land use and planning techniques that have been used to encourage TOD in communities around the country.

Building Livable Communities with Transit Planning: Developing and Implementing Community-Sensitive Transit
The Federal Transit Administration, through its Livable Communities Initiative, issued this manual to help local governments, transit agencies and transit planners address community concerns as they develop and enhance transit facilities.

Building a Transit Friendly Coummunity
This guidebook, put out by NJ TRANSIT, documents key findings from NJ TRANSIT’s pilot program Transit-Friendly Communities for New Jersey, a community planning assistance program, and to share lessons learned from the program with other communities in New Jersey and around the country.

Communicating the Benefits of TOD: The City of Evanston’s Transit-Oriented Development and the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Transit System
This report examines two sub-regions that have capitalized on the benefits realized from transit-oriented “redevelopment” — Hoboken and Jersey City in New Jersey, and Evanston, Illinois. Formerly in economic decline, both areas are now economic engines.

Mixed-Income Transit-Oriented Development Action Guide
The Mixed-Income Transit-Oriented Development Action Guide is an online tool that takes communities through a step-by-step analysis designed to help retain and increase lower income TOD housing as well as to optimize the benefits that can be gained through careful planning.

The New Transit Town: Best Practices in Transit-Oriented Development
In this book, the demographic trends that favor an increasing demand for TOD are outlined, as are the key issues of design, supportive public policy, and finance that often determine TOD’s fate, followed by case study chapters.

Planning for Transit-Friendly Land Use: A Handbook for New Jersey Communities
This handbook is designed to assist planning officials, planning and zoning boards, technical staff and the general community in creating an environment around a transit stop that is a safe, clean, vibrant and active place.

Revitalizing Main Street: A Practitioner’s Guide to Comprehensive Commercial Revitalization
A comprehensive resource from the National Trust for Historic Preservation offers readers a detailed look at the many aspects of downtown growth and development, including a wide range of best practices and case studies.

TOD 101: Why Transit-Oriented Development and Why Now?
Reconnecting America and the Center for Transit-Oriented Development have published a new 24-page “picture” book highlighting the benefits of TOD and how it can help maintain the economic vitality of communities.

TOD 202: Station Area Planning: How to Make Great Transit-Oriented Places
This handbook, a follow up to its TOD 101: Why Transit-Oriented Development and Why Now?, is designed to promote best practices in transit-oriented development by simplifying the complex decisions involved in planning for TOD.

Transit-Oriented Development in the United States: Experiences, Challenges and Prospects
This comprehensive analysis of TOD practice examines its impacts, benefits, and barriers, as well as the public policies, implementation tools, and financing mechanisms that developers and public officials have found to be most useful.

Who is TOD in Metro Denver?
In 2009-2010, Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG) surveyed residents, employees, and businesses located near rail stations in the metro region – gaining a snapshot of individual, household and business preferences of those living and working near TODs.

Hidden in Plain Sight: Capturing the Demand for Housing Near Transit
This report studies the demand for housing near America’s existing rapid transit systems and finds that demand for such housing will likely double (to 14.6 million households) by 2025, which the market and public sector must make efforts to encourage and capture it.

Mixed-Income Transit-Oriented Development Action Guide
The Mixed-Income Transit-Oriented Development Action Guide is an online tool that takes communities through a step-by-step analysis designed to help retain and increase lower income TOD housing as well as to optimize benefits that can be gained through careful planning.

Preserving Affordability and Access in Livable Communities: Subsidized Housing Opportunities near Transit and the 50+ Population
This report surveyed federally-subsidized affordable housing in 20 cities and found that a significant number of Section 8 and Section 202 units are presently located in close proximity to transit, but raised concern about the continued affordability of many of these units.

TCRP Report 128: Effects of TOD on Housing, Parking and Travel
This report attempts to clarify the relationship between livable communities and transit, looking at travel patterns in 17 TOD developments situated in four metropolitan areas, including New Jersey locales.

Who Lives in New Jersey Housing?
This publication, an update on national work done 20 years ago by Rutgers researchers, produces demographic information on household size and pupil generation that is current, New Jersey specific, and incorporates the experience of emerging development categories, such as TODs.

Transit-Oriented Development: Developing a Strategy to Measure Success
This digest offers a strategy to systematically evaluate the potential success of transit-oriented development, identifying and evaluating various indicators of the impacts of transit-oriented development, and singling out ten indicators.

The High Cost of Free Parking
In this innovative book, UCLA planning professor Donald Shoup challenges traditional parking methodologies and strategies. Free parking, Shoup argues, has contributed to auto dependence, rapid urban sprawl, extravagant energy use, and a host of other problems.

Parking Management Best Practices
The parking management strategies described in this book can help planners increase parking facility efficiency and reduce demand, offering an alternative to the traditional model of “predict and provide” parking planning, which has contributed to auto dependency and urban sprawl.

Parking Matters
This monograph describes the challenges of financing structured parking in urban areas, providing information on issues affecting design, operations and financing of parking, along with a “toolbox” of funding solutions.

Parking Spaces/Community Places: Finding the Balance Through Smart Growth Solutions
This report from the EPA provides a summary of the financial and environmental costs of parking, describes the dubious criteria on which most parking requirements are based, and offers alternative parking strategies that support TOD and other Smart Growth efforts.

Paved Over: Surface Parking Lots or Opportunities for Tax-Generating, Sustainable Development
This study of the Chicago region examines the potential development benefits of more intensive use of surface parking near transit, comparing current costs of surface parking lots near rail stations with the potential benefits if they were developed instead into TOD.

TCRP Report 128: Effects of TOD on Housing, Parking and Travel
This report attempts to clarify the relationship between livable communities and transit, looking at travel patterns in 17 TOD developments situated in four metropolitan areas, including New Jersey locales.

America Needs Compete Streets, Institute of Transportation Engineers Journal
The Complete Streets movement strives to make all streets safe and accessible for all users by considering the concerns of drivers, transit riders, cyclists, and pedestrians of all abilities at the same level of importance.

Bursting the Bubble: Determining Transit-Oriented Development’s Walkable Limits
The author challenges the “half-mile circle” that currently defines the limit of transit-oriented development by examining new research that cites variability in this assumption: transit users may be willing to walk further distances that previously thought.

Complete Streets: Best Policy and Implementation Practices. PSA Report Number 559
The APA, in conjunction with the National Complete Streets Coalition, recently released a Planning Advisory Service report on complete streets titled Complete Streets: Best Policy and Implementation Practices.

Creating Walkable Places
Richly illustrated with photographs, site plans, and diagrams, this book explains how to create pedestrian-friendly, mixed-use developments including those with “transit-oriented cores,” helping leaders understand the possibilities of compact development focused around walking and biking.

Getting to Work: Reconnecting Jobs with Transit
New Jersey Future released Getting to Work, a report documenting the commuting habits of New Jersey residents and demonstrating the important connection between the state’s pattern of employment locations and its transportation challenges.

Moving Cooler: An Analysis of Transportation Strategies for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions
According to this report, energy-efficient vehicles and cleaner fuels alone will not solve the nation’s problem of excess greenhouse gas emissions; the U.S. must also adopt policies that encourage compact development, reduce driving and expand mass transit use.

Strengths and Weaknesses of Bus in Relation to Transit-Oriented Development
The author offers an assessment of the strengths and weakness of bus transit-oriented development and discusses many of the issues confronting it, including flexibility, parking, permanence, service frequency, and unfamiliarity with this form of TOD.

TCRP Report 128: Effects of TOD on Housing, Parking and Travel
This report attempts to clarify the relationship between livable communities and transit, looking at travel patterns in 17 TOD developments situated in four metropolitan areas, including New Jersey locales.